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September 30, 2009

Movie writers get it… how about educators?

by Chris Lindholm

Recent development in technology has resulted in a tidal wave of new information about how the human brain works.  As the research is published, those who can profit from the information have rushed to understand it – and use it to better persuade, manipulate, or change the behaviors of their targeted audience.  Most obvious in this camp are advertising companies and political institutions.  A CNN article yesterday covered one more example of this focused on the writers of film – Neurocinema.  These insitutions are driven by a desire to make a profit – they certainly do not have "the common good" centered in their sites.  This begs a question…  Why don't those of us who are targeting "the common good" seek out this information with the same tenacity?  What does current research tell us about how schools should do business?  How should this change the approach of doing ministry?  Non-profit work?  Programming for community children?  Just yesterday, Josh Lehrer blogged about fasting and the effects of low glucose levels on the performance of the pre-frontal cortex in his post called fasting.  It certainly isn't earth shattering… but the research tells us something about how we work with students who suffer from poor nutrition.  It may also tell us something about school procedures regarding food, drinks, and class schedules. 

Thoughts?

 

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